Thursday, January 30, 2020

Organic Food and Wild Oats Essay Example for Free

Organic Food and Wild Oats Essay Strong revenue growth Focused growth strategy Wide product portfolioWeak international operations Conservative international policy Increasing rental expenses OpportunitiesThreats Higher demand for organic products Expansion in the UK Growth in private label productsIncreasing competition Labeling and other regulations Slowdown in the US economy StrengthsWeaknesses Strong revenue growth Focused growth strategy Wide product portfolioWeak international operations Conservative international policy Increasing rental expenses OpportunitiesThreats Higher demand for organic products. Expansion in the UK Growth in private label productsIncreasing competition Labeling and other regulations Slowdown in the US economy AI Global Management. 8-26-14. INSTRUCTOR: Who wasnt here last week? Im looking at Michelle. So you are the only one that wasnt here last week? Mrs. Johnson were you here last week. Im going to pass out the assignments for next week for you. STUDENT: The PowerPoint one. INSTRUCTOR: Whole foods. So what you had to do just to remind everybody you have to take a look at those two companies, and do some research, did find out strategically what really happened? STUDENT: Do you have extra copies? I wasnt here last week. INSTRUCTOR: I thought I asked who wasnt here last week? Okay. We have to strategically do some research on both of these companies. You have your case study in front of you very thorough. You have to find out what kind of decision was made that created really an issue for Wild Oats because initially when this company was put together, they were killing Whole Foods. They were Whole Foods before Whole Foods existed. They were doing wonderful. Growing, expanding in the same type of market. I know both cases, so I know a lot of answers, but all of a sudden some decision was made in their minds relatively strategic, but it turned out to be some pretty bad decisions. How many of you has heard of Wild Oats. All of us have heard of Whole Foods because they are in existence. So you have to run this as if you are the CEO of both take both sides. Compare and contrast and take a look at Wild Oats, and what happened to them. Take a look at the great decision, and then things started going south relatively quickly for them. Yet Whole Foods was the underdog. Now Whole Foods is doing. Well, I guess. Manufacture moving forward.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Berlin Diaries Vs.Survival In Auschwitz :: essays research papers

Berlin Diaries vs. Survival in Auschwitz   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The two books Berlin Diaries by Marie Vassiltchikov and Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi both chronicle World War II from two different perspectives. They are both personal accounts from each author’s actual experiences. The two books have different formats, points, facts, and actualities. For example, Berlin Diaries is in actual diary format, and Survival in Auschwitz is in story format. I found that Berlin Diaries was harder to read because of the format, where Survival in Auschwitz was easier to follow. Also both stories were taken from two very different points of view. Marie Vassiltchikov was a Russian aristocrat that fled Russia and was seeking refuge in Germany. Primo Levi was an Italian Jew who was captured by the Nazis and taken to a concentration camp. Vassiltchikov was free, she lived a restricted life, but she still had her freedom. Levi was a prisoner; he lived a captive slave life and had no liberties or freedoms. This difference seems to b e the most consequential. They led such different lives. Levi was the absolute bane of the Nazi existence, as they were to him. In contrast, Vassiltchikov actually worked for the Nazis; granted to have the freedom that she did, that’s where she had to work. But still, Vassiltchikov had freedom, how much more different could one get from being a Jewish prisoner in a Nazi concentration camp, as Levi was. There are so many points to this major contrast that it almost encompasses the entire concept of comparing and contrasting he two.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  While there could not be anything more opposite than having freedom and being a prisoner, there were still other differences that had no regard to Vassiltchikov and Levi’s actual living conditions. Missy (Vassiltchikov) originally was fleeing the Russian army. They would have killed her for being an aristocrat. Primo’s danger was always from the Nazis. His Jewish â€Å"race† was his mark of death. As mentioned above, Missy was a Russian aristocrat; Primo was from the working class of Italy. Generally their demographic backgrounds could not get much different either. Religion was also a major and blinding difference. Also as mentioned above Primo was a Jew and Missy was Christian. This difference is what separated them further in Missy’s freedom and Primo’s captivity.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Another difference that played a huge role in each book was the actual placing of each story. Berlin Diaries Vs.Survival In Auschwitz :: essays research papers Berlin Diaries vs. Survival in Auschwitz   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The two books Berlin Diaries by Marie Vassiltchikov and Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi both chronicle World War II from two different perspectives. They are both personal accounts from each author’s actual experiences. The two books have different formats, points, facts, and actualities. For example, Berlin Diaries is in actual diary format, and Survival in Auschwitz is in story format. I found that Berlin Diaries was harder to read because of the format, where Survival in Auschwitz was easier to follow. Also both stories were taken from two very different points of view. Marie Vassiltchikov was a Russian aristocrat that fled Russia and was seeking refuge in Germany. Primo Levi was an Italian Jew who was captured by the Nazis and taken to a concentration camp. Vassiltchikov was free, she lived a restricted life, but she still had her freedom. Levi was a prisoner; he lived a captive slave life and had no liberties or freedoms. This difference seems to b e the most consequential. They led such different lives. Levi was the absolute bane of the Nazi existence, as they were to him. In contrast, Vassiltchikov actually worked for the Nazis; granted to have the freedom that she did, that’s where she had to work. But still, Vassiltchikov had freedom, how much more different could one get from being a Jewish prisoner in a Nazi concentration camp, as Levi was. There are so many points to this major contrast that it almost encompasses the entire concept of comparing and contrasting he two.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  While there could not be anything more opposite than having freedom and being a prisoner, there were still other differences that had no regard to Vassiltchikov and Levi’s actual living conditions. Missy (Vassiltchikov) originally was fleeing the Russian army. They would have killed her for being an aristocrat. Primo’s danger was always from the Nazis. His Jewish â€Å"race† was his mark of death. As mentioned above, Missy was a Russian aristocrat; Primo was from the working class of Italy. Generally their demographic backgrounds could not get much different either. Religion was also a major and blinding difference. Also as mentioned above Primo was a Jew and Missy was Christian. This difference is what separated them further in Missy’s freedom and Primo’s captivity.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Another difference that played a huge role in each book was the actual placing of each story.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Love and Logic Philosophy

Benson, Galbraith, and Espeland, (1995) defines love and logic as a philosophy concerned with raising children in such a way that makes both the teachers and students more satisfied and contented, empowered, skilled and able to relate in a mutually beneficial manner that allows for the students to learn in a free environment.   The philosophy ensures that, adults demonstrate enough love to children which in turn makes the children to feel freer and at ease in the learning process.   This is very important to a learning environment. Benson, Galbraith, and Espeland, (1995) notes that, a learning environment should be devoid of barriers such as noise barrier, communication barriers and also psychological barriers such as the negative relations between teachers and children. The incidences of disruptive behaviour from school children has been on the increase for the past few decades yet the education system has either been unresponsive to the emerging challenges or the educators and policy makers have been totally aloof to the situation.   This has led to a lot of children dropping out of schools and therefore disrupting their lives.   This has had other far reaching consequences such as that; the children who discontinue studies may end up engaging in criminal activities.   For the teachers, the above trends have led to special challenges in that, the public expects them to deliver oblivious of the unique classroom difficulties. As Benson, Galbraith, and Espeland, (1995) notes, indiscipline negatively affects the learning environment and therefore an undisciplined class is more likely to perform poorly than a disciplined class. According to (Cline, & Fay, 1990), America has experienced a significant increase in disruptive behaviour in school going children such as; violence, intolerable behavior, as well as substance misuse.   In a study carried out by (Benson, Galbraith, & Espelland, 1995), it was found out that punishment, does not actually reduce cases of classroom indiscipline but on the contrary, it causes an increase in indiscipline incidences.   All the above led to combined efforts to find a solution for the increasing cases of indiscipline and ultimately resulted in the experimentation of the love and logic philosophy which was rather correctional approach as opposed to a punitive one (Finn, 1989).   The love and logic philosophy holds that, children can succeed in the classroom for as long as the teacher shows compassion, demonstrates tolerance. This leads to the children to connect compassion and love to logical consequences (Finn, 1989). In a study of 270,000 students carried out by   Benson, Galbraith, and Espeland, (1995) found out that criminal behaviour, academic failure and substance abuse are easily avoidable by applying the principles of love and logic. Such principles include, supportive and loving family and school environment, a positive relationship between children and adults, high achievement and motivation, good communication between parents and children as well as decision making skills and optimism about the world and the children’s future.   All the above are developmental concerns which a teacher can address in the classroom. In another study by (Weir, 1997) which involved the implementation of love and logic program in an elementary level, the results overwhelmingly pointed to the effectiveness of the love and logic philosophy.   After implementation teachers were required to give feedback on some variables.   It was reported that, 87% of teachers experienced an improvement in student behavior, 84% noted experiencing improved relationships with students, 68% reported that as a result of the love and logic program, student disruptions had significantly decreased, 71% noted getting time for more teaching as a result of decreased disruptions, while 82% noted that, discipline had improved and they felt that they were in charge of the classroom. When adults demonstrate love, the children feel less threatened and are therefore more likely to learn in unthreatening environment whereby the children are not afraid of making mistakes (Cline, & Fay, 1990).   Through logic, children are empowered to accept the consequences of their actions as well as decisions and are therefore more likely to cope with consequences arising out of the choices the children make. According to (Cline, & Fay, 1990), love and logic are a prerequisite for a working relationship amongst teachers, children and parents in which the parents and teachers take control over the children and their actions.   Love and logic are very important to teachers in that, they give the teacher the necessary control needed in classroom environment for learning to take place effectively.   The logic and love philosophy instills in children a sense of responsibility which is crucial especially when it comes to learning activities which teachers assign to children such as assignments and homework. With a more disciplined class, the teacher is more likely to gain control over the class and therefore become more efficient in delivery of the subject content.   Love and logic, are important for teachers in that, besides passing knowledge, teachers act as caregivers and are mandated to ensure that the students learn life’s skills such as social skills and decision making which are important in bringing up responsible and disciplined children. This goes a long way in making sure that, when the children come out of school, they do not have difficulties in coping with the outside world.   (Benson, Galbraith, & Espelland, 1995) notes that, logic and love is a good alternative for counselling with the added advantages such as the fact that; logic and love approaches are realistic, simple and easy for the children to learn (Bandura, 1977).   Logic and love has been noted as one of the few philosophies which do not depend on age in that, children of all ages can learn important life skills even at a very tender age. Therefore teaching using the logic and love approach allows a learner to gain in the maximum way possible due to the usually close ties with the teacher. The teachers as well benefit mutually in that, the self direction the student demonstrates is an empowerment in the classroom and it allows the learner to grow up into better citizen ready to face the future challenges which lie ahead of the students once they leave the classrooms. Love and logic takes into consideration teacher and student relations by encouraging the two parties to connect easily. By enforcing the concept of self, shared control, shared thinking as well as empathy and consequences, logic and love as a philosophical approach of teaching results into a well rounded child who proceed to the outside world ready to meet the numerous challenges and able are to overcome (Bandura, 1977). Love and logic, results into a classroom environment in which the culture is that of; self determination, self dedication, self discipline as well as self empowerment for the children.   On the other side, the teachers are able to execute their professional duties with zeal and in total confidence that the objectives and goals of learning will be achieved. Conclusion Love and logic philosophy is grounded in the belief that every child has positive traits and has the potential to grow and develop into useful and resourceful members of the society.   The children learn in a non-confrontational environment and are able to relate well to the teacher.   It saves time which otherwise goes into solving indiscipline cases. For the school, logic and love saves valuable time and it is easy for the school to improve on performance.   Love and logic is a very effective approach in dealing with disruptive students who threaten the smooth learning in the classroom.   When such children are shown love, care, concern and patience, they easily transform and are capable of reforming and are very likely to become some of the best and cooperative students in the classroom. Reference Bandura, A. (1977). Social learning theory. Eaglewood Cliffs, NJ. Prentice-Hall. Benson, P, Galbraith, J, & Espelland, P. (1995). What kids need to succeed: Proven, practical ways to raise good kids? Minneapolis, MN. Free Spirit Publishing. Cline, F & Fay, J (1990). Parenting with love and logic. Colorado Springs, CO: Pirion Press. Finn, J (1989).   Withdrawing from school. Review of educational research, 59. Weir, B (1997). An evaluation of the effects of love and logic at McCullough Elementary School. Unpublished outcome study.   

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Motivation Theory by Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg...

A review of literature reveals that in the past several decades, there is a number of concepts or models regarding the motivation of volunteers. As volunteers and placement students in Hilton Prague and Hilton Prague Old Town are similar in their nature, these concepts or models could also be applied to the motivation of placement students in Hilton hotels in Prague. Two of the earlier on some of the most widely discussed theories on motivation were proposed by psychologists Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg. Maslow introduced his Hierarchy of needs in 1943 and later fully developed it in 1954. This model consists of 5 levels of basic needs, often portrayed in a pyramid or triangular shape. The most fundamental needs are at the bottom†¦show more content†¦In 1978, Gidron came up with three different motives for volunteering: personal (self-fulfilment), social (creating interpersonal relations) and indirectly economic (gaining work experience). This concept was developed on the basis of Herzberg ´s Two-factor theory (1966) which was introduced above. In the 1980 ´s, various authors were examining the volunteer motivations (Francies 1983, Henderson 1984, Chapman 1985, Daniels 1985, Grieshop 1985, Miller 1985, Rubin Thorelli 1985) and these studies were mainly centred around the two or three factor model (Esmond Dunlop 2004). The two-factor model was established by Horton-Smith (1981) and he stated that motives for volunteer motivation can be either altruistic or egoistic. Altruistic motives can be interpreted as intangible rewards such as helping others whereas egoistic motives are usually tangible rewards (Horton-Smith 1981). This model was later seconded by Frisch Gerrard (1981) and Gillespie King (1985) based on two separate studies of Red Cross volunteers. In the 1980 ´s several authors (McCurley Vineyard 1988, Wilson 1983) began to discuss volunteer motivation in their work. They were mainly using well-known concepts such as Maslow ´s Hierarchy of Needs (1943) and Herzberg ´s Two-factor theory (1966). Some authors implemented in their work three-factor model rather than two-factor modelShow MoreRelatedThe Main Factors That Can Drive Motivation, Using Theories By Abraham Maslow And Frederick Herzberg1410 Words   |  6 PagesIn this essay, I will be discussing the main factors that can drive motivation, using theories by Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg. I have chosen Tesco to display how they motivate their employees in the work setting. Motivation is a key factor that influences the work environment. I will speak about what workers are motivated by, why they keep coming to work and what drives them during work. I will speak about why motivation is important and the internal and external stimuli. 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